Jerusalem

Words: William Blake 1804

Music: C. Hubert H. Parry in 1916

The text of the poem was inspired by the legend that Jesus, while still a young man, accompanied Joseph of Arimathea to Glastonbury. In 2003 Jerusalem topped a Music Choice poll, with 51% of the vote, of more than 2000 English people asked what song they would choose to represent their country. And in 2010 the public voted to for Jerusalem to be England’s victory anthem at the 2012 Commonwealth Games, replacing Land of Hope and Glory which had been used in previous years without public consultation.

Jerusalem has been the most popular choice of anthem on polls conducted by anthem4england.

The song is always sung at the Rugby League Challenge Cup Final and since 2004 it has been sung at the beginning of England cricket matches.

Jerusalem

And did those feet in ancient time
Walk upon England’s mountains green?
And was the holy Lamb of God
On England’s pleasant pastures seen?

And did the Countenance Divine
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here
Among those dark Satanic mills?

Bring me my bow of burning gold!
Bring me my arrows of desire!
Bring me my spear! O clouds, unfold!
Bring me my chariot of fire!

I will not cease from mental fight
Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand
Till we have built Jerusalem
In England’s green and pleasant land

Random Quote

Why do national anthems sound so alike? Why do countries all salute the same tinny marches with their dotted rhythms and major keys, rather than draw on their distinctive musical heritage?

— Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim, Jerusalem Post

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